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Begin Your Journey with C

To initiate your learning in C, you require the following:

  • A text editor for crafting C code
  • A compiler like GCC to convert the C code into a machine-understandable language

There are various text editors and compilers to select from. For this tutorial, an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) will be used by us.

Setting up the C IDE

An IDE is a software suite that consolidates the basic tools needed to write and test the code. Popular IDEs include Code::Blocks, Eclipse, and Visual Studio which are all free to use and facilitate both the editing and debugging of C code.

Note: Although web-based IDEs can be used, they typically have more limitations compared to their desktop counterparts.

We recommend starting with Code::Blocks. The latest version can be downloaded from here.

Let's Start with C

Create your first C file by following the steps below:

  1. Open Codeblocks
  2. Go to File > New > Empty File
  3. Write the following C code and save the file as myfirstprogram.c:
#include <stdio.h>, int main() { printf("Welcome to Fynd Academy!"); return 0;}

The above code might seem incomprehensible for now, we'll break it down in later chapters. For now, concentrate on running the code.

Executing Your Code

After writing the code, it's time to run it. In Codeblocks, navigate to Build > Build and Run. Your result will look something like this:

Welcome to Fynd Academy!

Great job! You've just written and executed your first C program.

Your C Learning Journey with Fynd Academy

Learning C with Fynd Academy is facilitated by our "Practice it Yourself" tool. It concurrently illustrates the code and the outcome, simplifying every new part you learn:

#include <stdio.h>int main() { printf("Welcome to Fynd Academy!"); return 0;} Welcome to Fynd Academy!

Practice it Yourself ยป

Fynd Academy Pathfinder

Track your progress as you embark on your learning journey. Best of all, it's complimentary!

Here's the HTML adapted with your given instructions: ``` <h1>C Memory Management Example</h1> <p>Practical Memory Management Example</p> <p>To showcase a practical instance of dynamic memory, we devised a program capable of forming a list of any unlimited length. Unlike C's regular arrays with fixed length, dynamic memory allows us to establish a list of any desired length:</p> <h2>Example</h2> <pre> struct listRecord { int *dataPacket; int itemCount; int size; }; void listInsertion(struct listRecord *record, int itemElement); int main() { struct listRecord record; int volume; record.itemCount = 0; record.size = 10; record.dataPacket = malloc(record.size * sizeof(int)); if (record.dataPacket == NULL) { printf("Memory allocation failed"); return 1; } volume = 44; for (int i = 0; i < volume; i++) { listInsertion(&record, i + 1); } for (int j = 0; j < record.itemCount; j++) { printf("%d ", record.dataPacket[j]); } free(record.dataPacket); record.dataPacket = NULL; return 0; } void listInsertion(struct listRecord *record, int itemElement) { if (record->itemCount == record->size) { record->size += 10; record->dataPacket = realloc(record->dataPacket, record->size * sizeof(int)); } record->dataPacket[record->itemCount] = itemElement; record->itemCount++; } </pre> <h3>Structures to Pointers</h3> <p>This example uses a pointer to the record structure. We use the arrow syntax (->) to access the structure's members since we are using a pointer to the structure rather than the structure itself.</p> <h2>Example Explanation</h2> <p>This example divides into three parts:</p> <ol> <li>A structure record that contains a list's data</li> <li>The main() function with the code</li> <li>A function listInsertion() to add an item to the list</li> </ol> </details> <h3>The Record Structure</h3> <pre> // Initializing the list with room for 10 items record.itemCount = 0; record.size = 10; record.dataPacket = malloc(record.size * sizeof(int)); </pre> <h4>Error Checking</h4> <pre> // Verifying if memory allocation was a success if (record.dataPacket == NULL) { printf("Memory allocation failed"); return 1; } </pre> <h3>Adding Items to List</h3> <pre> volume = 44; for (int i = 0; i < volume; i++) { listInsertion(&record, i + 1); } </pre> <h4>Printing List Content and Freeing Memory</h4> <pre> for (int j = 0; j < record.itemCount; j++) { printf("%d ", record.dataPacket[j]); } free(record.dataPacket); record.dataPacket = NULL; </pre> <h3>The listInsertion() Function</h3> <p>Our listInsertion() function inserts an item to the list. It takes two arguments:</p> <ol> <li>A pointer to the list or record</li> <li>The value to be included in the list</li> </ol> <pre> // If list is filled, resize memory to accommodate 10 more items if (record->itemCount == record->size) { record->size += 10; record->dataPacket = realloc(record->dataPacket, record->size * sizeof(int)); } record->dataPacket[record->itemCount] = itemElement; record->itemCount++; </pre> <h4>Why do we reserve 10 items at a time?</h4> <p>We allocate some unused memory to strike the balance between memory and performance. Although it could be inefficient, it keeps a balance between allocating excessive memory and allocating it too often. The number 10 was chosen for this particular instance, but it depends on your anticipated data volume and its frequency of change. For instance, if we know in advance that we are going to have exactly 44 items, we can allocate memory for those 44 items at once.</p> <h5>Pathfinder</h5> <p>Stay on top of your progress - it's free!</p> ``` Please take a look and let me know if you need more modifications.